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ATTITUDE CHANGE STRATEGIES:Resolving two conflicting attitudes

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Consumer Psychology (PSY - 514)
VU
LESSON35
ATTITUDE CHANGE STRATEGIES
CHAPTER 5: INDIVIDUAL DETERMINANTS OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
Understanding:
 Attitude Change Strategies
Associating the product with admired group or events
Resolving two conflicting attitudes
Changing consumers believes about competitor's brands
Attitude Change Strategies
Attitude Change Strategies available to the marketers include:
1. Changing the consumers basic motivational function
2. Associating the product with admired group or events
3. Resolving two conflicting attitudes
4. Changing consumers beliefs about competitor's brands
We discussed strategy no.1 in our last lecture. In this section we will study the remaining three strategies.
2. Associating the product with admired group or events
Attitudes are related at least in part to special groups, events or causes. It is possible to alter attitudes towards
companies and their products, services and brands by pointing put their relationships to particular social groups,
events or causes. For example a detergent powder advertising that a certain percentage of their profits will be
going towards educating the poor children of the country.
A study found that both the brand and the cause benefit from such alliances. A low familiar cause benefits more
from its association with a positive brand than a highly familiar cause.
Another research found that if corporate sponsors fail to explicitly indicate their motives for a company/cause or
product/cause association, it is likely that consumer will from their own motive for the association between the
company, product or service and the cause. The research indicates that it is good idea for a sponsor to reveal to
target consumers the reasoning behind their sponsorship, so that consumers know their motives rather than form
their own potentially inaccurate or negative motives.
3. Resolving two conflicting attitudes
Attitude change strategies sometimes resolve actual or potential conflict between two attitudes. If the consumers
may be made to see that their negative attitude towards a product or a specific brand or attributes is not in conflict
with another attitude. They may be induced to change their evaluation of a brand (from negative to positive).
Usually detergent powders are effective in cleaning but these also cause a bad effect on the skin. Now in some
countries seventh generation of natural dishwashing and laundry detergents is introduced. These are as effective as
synthetic chemical cleaning agents and are safer because they are natural. For a person who cares about both
effectiveness and environmental safety Seventh generation is attempting to resolve what might otherwise be
conflicting attitudes.
Multi attribute models
Multi attribute models portray consumers' attitudes with regard to an attitude object (product, service, etc...) as a
function of consumers' perceptions and assessments of the key attributes or beliefs held with regards to a
particular attitude object. According to these models attitude change can be brought about in four ways:
1. Changing the relative evaluation of attributes
2. Changing brand beliefs
3. Adding an attribute
4. Changing the over-all brand rating
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Consumer Psychology (PSY - 514)
VU
1. Changing the relative evaluation of attributes
The overall market for many consumer products is set out so that different consumer segments are offered
different brands with different features. If detergent powder is a product category then one brand may stress
potency and the other brand may stress gentleness.
In general when a product category is naturally divided according to distinct product features or benefits that
appeal to a particular segment of consumers marketers usually have an opportunity to persuade consumers to
"cross over". That is persuading consumers to shift their favorable attitude from one version of the product to the
other.
2. Changing brand beliefs
A cognitive oriented strategy for changing attitudes that concentrates on changing beliefs or perceptions about the
brand itself - a most common form of advertising appeal. Advertisers are constantly reminding us that their
product is "more" is "better" or "the best".
For example Dishwashing Liquid:
o  Palmolive dishwashing liquids are designed to extend consumers' beliefs with regard to product's
gentleness by suggesting that it be used for hand washing of fine clothing items
Bush's Baked Beans
o  We couldn't make our secret family recipe any better, so we made it easier (by placing it in a
microwavable cup)
3. Adding an attribute
This strategy can be accomplished by adding an attribute that previously has been ignored or one that represents
improvement or technological advancement.
For example previously ignored attribute Yogurt has more potassium than a banana (a fruit associated with high
quantity of potassium) for a consumer looking to increase their potassium intake the comparison has the power to
change their attitude from banana to yogurt. Another example may be of a refrigerator that has an advanced and
unique water filtration system, a feature that reflects a company's continued efforts to create innovative products.
4. Changing the over-all brand rating
Another cognitive oriented strategy that attempts to alter consumers' overall rating of a brand directly, without
attempting to change their evaluation of any single brand attribute. Such strategy frequently relies on some form of
global statement that this is:
"the largest selling brand"
"thee most awarded car ever"
Changing Beliefs about Competitor's Brands
This approach emphasizes the attitude strategy to change the consumers' beliefs about the attributes of
competitive brands. E.g. a pain killer advertises that no other pain killer works faster or stronger on muscle pain.
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Table of Contents:
  1. INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY:Consumer Behavior
  2. INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY:Consumer research
  3. INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY:Marketing Mix, Product, Price
  4. INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY:Customer Value, Perceived Value
  5. VALUE AND RETENTION FOCUSED MARKETING AND CONSUMER DECISION MAKING PROCESS
  6. CONSUMER RESEARCH:Quantitative Research, Qualitative Research
  7. MAJOR STEPS IN CONSUMER RESEARCH PROCESS:Design of Primary research
  8. QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGNS & DATA COLLECTION METHODS
  9. QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH DATA COLLECTION TECHNIQUES:ATTITUDE SCALES
  10. QUALITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGNS & DATA COLLECTION METHODS
  11. CUSTOMER SATISFACTION MEASUREMENT, SAMPLING, AND DATA ANALYSIS AND REPORTING
  12. MARKET SEGMENTATION AND ITS BASES:Geographical Segmentation
  13. BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: DEMOGRAPHIC SEGMENTATION PSYCHOGRAPHIC SEGMENTATION
  14. BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: SOCIOCULTURAL SEGMENTATION USE RELATED SEGMENTATION USAGE SITUATION SEGMENTATION
  15. BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: BENEFIT SEGMENTATION:Intrinsic Cues
  16. BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: HYBRID SEGMENTATION STRATEGIES
  17. MARKET SEGMENTATION IMPLEMENTING SEGMENTATION STRATEGIES ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES CULTURE
  18. HOW CULTURE IS LEARNT ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Formal Learning
  19. CULTURE AND ITS MEASUREMENT ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES
  20. MEASUREMENT OF CULTURE ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Consumer Fieldwork
  21. SUBCULTURE CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES
  22. AGE AND GENDER SUBCULTURE CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES
  23. BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: BENEFIT SEGMENTATION:Market Segmentation
  24. SOCIAL CLASS CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Occupation
  25. CONSUMER SOCIAL CLASSES CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Affluent Consumer
  26. CONSUMER SOCIAL CLASSES CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Membership Group
  27. CONSUMER SOCIAL CLASSES CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Shopping Groups
  28. UNDERSTANDING PERSONALITY CHAPTER 5: INDIVIDUAL DETERMINANTS OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
  29. CONSUMER PERSONALITY, TRAIT THEORY AND SELF IMAGES
  30. CONSUMER MOTIVATION:Needs, Goals, Generic Goals
  31. UNDERSTANDING LEARNING:Intentional and Incidental Learning, Implications for Marketers
  32. INSTRUMENTAL CONDITIONING, INFORMATION PROCESSING AND MEMORY
  33. ATTITUDES:Characteristics of Attitudes, Attitudes have consistency
  34. ATTITUDE FORMATION AND CHANGE:How attitudes are learned?
  35. ATTITUDE CHANGE STRATEGIES:Resolving two conflicting attitudes
  36. INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER DECISION MAKING:Decision Complexity
  37. Problem Recognition, Search and Evaluation and Decision and Purchase
  38. Decision and Purchase:Consumer Decision Rules, Output, Relationship Marketing
  39. Decisions Related to Post Purchase:Product Set up and Use
  40. Marketing Implications of Decisions Related to Post Purchase:Understanding
  41. Post Purchase Evaluation:Determinants of Satisfaction, Consumer Complaint Behavior
  42. Post Purchase Dissonance:Dissonance Reduction, Marketing Implications
  43. Consumerism:Roots of Consumerism, The Nature of Consumerism
  44. Consumerism Issues and Responses:Environmental Concerns, Consumer Privacy
  45. Review Consumer Psychology Course:Consumer Research, Consumerism