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Post Purchase Evaluation:Determinants of Satisfaction, Consumer Complaint Behavior

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Consumer Psychology (PSY - 514)
VU
Lecture 41
Post Purchase Evaluation
Understanding:
Post Purchase Evaluation
Consumer Complaint Behavior
1. Post Purchase Evaluation
Consumer is uncertain of the wisdom of his decision; he rethinks this decision in the post purchase stage
Post purchase stage serves to broaden the consumer's set of experiences stored in the memory. It provides a check
on how well he is doing as a consumer in selecting products, stores, etc... Feedback that consumer receives from
this stage helps make adjustments in future purchasing strategies.
Satisfaction is an important element in the evaluation stage. Satisfaction refers to the buyer's state of being
adequately rewarded in buying situations for the sacrifice he has made.
Adequacy of satisfaction is a result of matching actual post purchase and consumption experience with the
expected reward from the brand in terms of its anticipated potential to satisfy the consumer's motives
Hunt's definition: Satisfaction is a kind of stepping away from an experience and evaluating it ... One could have
a pleasurable experience that caused dissatisfaction because even though pleasurable, it wasn't as pleasurable as it
was supposed or expected to be. So satisfaction/dissatisfaction is not an emotion, it is the evaluation of an
emotion
Consumers' Expectations Prior to Purchase
Consumers form certain expectations prior to purchase. These include: the nature and performance of
product/service (the anticipated benefits to be derived directly from the item). The costs and efforts to be
expended before obtaining the direct product or service benefits and social benefits or costs accruing to the
consumers as a result of purchase (the anticipated impact of the purchase on significant others).
Determinants of Satisfaction
Growing body of research suggests that there are several determinants which appear to influence satisfaction
including:
 Demographic Variables
 Personality Variables
 Expectations
Some other important variables are:
Men tend to be more satisfied than women
The more confidence one has in purchase decision making and more competence in a given product area, the
greater one's satisfaction tends to be
Older consumers tend to have lower expectations and higher level of satisfaction
Higher education tends to be associated with lower satisfaction
There is also greater satisfaction when relevant others are perceived to be more satisfied
Higher levels of product satisfaction are also indicated by persons who are more satisfied with their lives as a
whole and by persons who are more satisfied with consumer domain that is market place, consumerism and
business firms
Relationship between Expectations and Performance
The interaction between expectations and actual product performance produces either satisfaction or
dissatisfaction. There, however, does not appear merely to be a direct relationship between the level of expectation
and level of satisfaction instead a modifying variables is more important here.
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Consumer Psychology (PSY - 514)
VU
Disconfirmation of Satisfaction
When a consumer does not get what is expected the situation can be described as disconfirmation. Positive
Disconfirmation occurs when what is perceived is better than what is expected. Negative Disconfirmation
occurs when things turn out worse than expected.
Confirmation occurs if the expectations from a product are met
2. Consumer Complaint Behavior
Consumers may exhibit unfavorable word-of-mouth communication, if they are dissatisfied with a product. In this
case, customers tell twice as many people about bad experiences as good ones and such behavior can severely
damage a company's image. Consumers may not repurchase the brand.
Third action several generalizations exist from research on consumer complaining:
Complainers tend to be of more upscale socio-economic groups than non-complainers
The severity of the dissatisfaction or problems is positively related to complaint behavior
Complaining is more likely when there is more positive perception of retailer responsiveness to customer
complaints
Model of Consumer Complaining Behavior
Consumers may complain not to seller but a third party such as news papers or legal system. They may engage in
private CCB e.g. telling friends and relatives about their bad experience and changing their patronage. They may
complain their voices to manufacturer or retailer involved or even take no action if they are loyal to seller and
believe that complaining is pointless
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Table of Contents:
  1. INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY:Consumer Behavior
  2. INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY:Consumer research
  3. INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY:Marketing Mix, Product, Price
  4. INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY:Customer Value, Perceived Value
  5. VALUE AND RETENTION FOCUSED MARKETING AND CONSUMER DECISION MAKING PROCESS
  6. CONSUMER RESEARCH:Quantitative Research, Qualitative Research
  7. MAJOR STEPS IN CONSUMER RESEARCH PROCESS:Design of Primary research
  8. QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGNS & DATA COLLECTION METHODS
  9. QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH DATA COLLECTION TECHNIQUES:ATTITUDE SCALES
  10. QUALITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGNS & DATA COLLECTION METHODS
  11. CUSTOMER SATISFACTION MEASUREMENT, SAMPLING, AND DATA ANALYSIS AND REPORTING
  12. MARKET SEGMENTATION AND ITS BASES:Geographical Segmentation
  13. BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: DEMOGRAPHIC SEGMENTATION PSYCHOGRAPHIC SEGMENTATION
  14. BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: SOCIOCULTURAL SEGMENTATION USE RELATED SEGMENTATION USAGE SITUATION SEGMENTATION
  15. BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: BENEFIT SEGMENTATION:Intrinsic Cues
  16. BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: HYBRID SEGMENTATION STRATEGIES
  17. MARKET SEGMENTATION IMPLEMENTING SEGMENTATION STRATEGIES ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES CULTURE
  18. HOW CULTURE IS LEARNT ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Formal Learning
  19. CULTURE AND ITS MEASUREMENT ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES
  20. MEASUREMENT OF CULTURE ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Consumer Fieldwork
  21. SUBCULTURE CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES
  22. AGE AND GENDER SUBCULTURE CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES
  23. BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: BENEFIT SEGMENTATION:Market Segmentation
  24. SOCIAL CLASS CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Occupation
  25. CONSUMER SOCIAL CLASSES CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Affluent Consumer
  26. CONSUMER SOCIAL CLASSES CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Membership Group
  27. CONSUMER SOCIAL CLASSES CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Shopping Groups
  28. UNDERSTANDING PERSONALITY CHAPTER 5: INDIVIDUAL DETERMINANTS OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
  29. CONSUMER PERSONALITY, TRAIT THEORY AND SELF IMAGES
  30. CONSUMER MOTIVATION:Needs, Goals, Generic Goals
  31. UNDERSTANDING LEARNING:Intentional and Incidental Learning, Implications for Marketers
  32. INSTRUMENTAL CONDITIONING, INFORMATION PROCESSING AND MEMORY
  33. ATTITUDES:Characteristics of Attitudes, Attitudes have consistency
  34. ATTITUDE FORMATION AND CHANGE:How attitudes are learned?
  35. ATTITUDE CHANGE STRATEGIES:Resolving two conflicting attitudes
  36. INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER DECISION MAKING:Decision Complexity
  37. Problem Recognition, Search and Evaluation and Decision and Purchase
  38. Decision and Purchase:Consumer Decision Rules, Output, Relationship Marketing
  39. Decisions Related to Post Purchase:Product Set up and Use
  40. Marketing Implications of Decisions Related to Post Purchase:Understanding
  41. Post Purchase Evaluation:Determinants of Satisfaction, Consumer Complaint Behavior
  42. Post Purchase Dissonance:Dissonance Reduction, Marketing Implications
  43. Consumerism:Roots of Consumerism, The Nature of Consumerism
  44. Consumerism Issues and Responses:Environmental Concerns, Consumer Privacy
  45. Review Consumer Psychology Course:Consumer Research, Consumerism