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AGE AND GENDER SUBCULTURE CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES

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BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: BENEFIT SEGMENTATION:Market Segmentation >>
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Consumer Psychology (PSY - 514)
VU
LESSON22
AGE AND GENDER SUBCULTURE
CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES
Understanding:
 Age subculture
 Gender subculture
9. Age Subculture
Important shifts occur in individual's demand for specific types of products and services as he or she goes from
being a dependent child to a senior citizen. A major age sub grouping of the population may be thought of as a
separate subculture e.g. teens influence purchases in approx all product categories. They select the stores in which
they spend their own money. By appealing to preteens, marketers build brand loyalty at an early stage. The
medium of choice for advertising for them is television
Teens are preoccupied with their appearance. They are more open to new ideas and new products and they are
avid television viewers. One view is that teens have segmented themselves into seven groups based on
psychographics. The groups are named:
1) Jarheads (athletes)
2) Nerds or geeks (computer wizards)
3) Prepsters or bushies (conservatives)
4) Surfer dudes (casual dressers/attitude
5) Heavy metal rockers/punks
6) Study gerkins, and
7) Bohos (poetry and black dress)
Popular Age Subcultures in USA
American Teenage Groups
Generation Y
Between 1977 and 1994
13-20 years
Generation X
Between 1965 and 1979
25 ­ 40 years
The Baby Boomers
Between 1946 and 64
40-60 years
1. Generation Y Market
Defining characteristics of Generation Y market are:
They are 13-20 years old and have grown up in a media saturated environment. They are aware of the marketing
hype. They immediately understand that when a shopping centre locates popular teen stores at opposite ends of
the mall they are being encouraged to walk the mall. Generation Y-ers split their time between TV viewing and
Internet and are less likely to read newspapers. They often do not trust the stores their parent's shopping.
2. Generation X Market
Generation X market is composed of the individuals who are born between 1965 and 1977 (25-40 years). They are
distrustful of marketing and look for a balance between work and leisure. These adults are close to their parents
and may return to live at home. They are not drawn to traditional forms of advertising (see it as "hyping"). Zen X-
ers express their need to stay in control by purchasing communications equipment such as beepers, fax machines,
e-mail, and mobile phones. They prefer products based on their practicality.
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Consumer Psychology (PSY - 514)
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3. Baby Boomers
Baby boomers are the individuals born between 1946 and 1964 (approximately 78 million). There total income is
over $1 trillion, increasing at a rate of 10% per year (versus 5% for the rest of the population). They have a high
level of education and have more discretionary income than other groups and they buy more and save less. Baby
Boomers are health conscious. They are becoming less materialistic in outlook and their product and service
selections reflect their concern for the environment and quality of life. They use credit cards extensively and the
higher income groups buy expensive exercise equipment and other personal/luxury goods. Boomers keep up with
fashions.
Seniors Citizens
Senior Citizens are older people who have played their innings and are mostly living a retired life. Their households
are small and their need for new purchases is limited. They enjoy convenience in the marketplace and appreciate
their leisure time. They spend more on others. They tend to perceive themselves as younger than their years (e.g.
65 year olds perceive themselves as age 50). Although they have a tendency to be brand loyal, they tend to try new
products or brands if given good reasons to do so. The senior market can further be segmented on the basis of
age, activity level, health, and mobility (65-74 and 75+ groups; active/healthy vs. poor health or disabled)
10. Gender Subculture
All societies tend to assign certain roles to women and others to men. The masculine role for example is that of
aggressiveness and competitiveness, whereas the feminine role is that of neatness, tactfulness, gentleness, and
talkativeness
Gender Difference Study
A study was conducted to understand the gender differences in reactions to similar prints. It was found that
women show superior affect and purchase intent towards ads that are verbal, harmonious, complex and category
oriented.
Men show superior affect towards ads that are comparative, simple and attribute oriented. It was concluded that it
may be best to advertise differently to men and women.
Consumer products and Gender Roles
Products are either exclusively or strongly associated with the members of one sex. For example shaving
equipment, cigars, pants, ties and work clothing are for men. Bracelets, hairsprays, hair dryers, sweet smelling
perfumes are considered feminine product.s
Men are Hunters; Women are Nurturers
(Internet Surfing Trends across the Genders)
The appeal for internet seems to be different for both men and women. Women go online to seek out reference
materials, online books, medical information, cooking ideas, government information and chat sites. Men tend to
focus on exploring and discovering, identifying free software and investments opportunities. Women are less likely
to purchase on the internet (32% for men VS 19% for women). Lesser purchase rate on the internet is because of
heightened concerns about online security and privacy.
Women as Depicted in the Media
Media and advertising create an expectation of beauty for women that they can never meet which is why most
women demand the definition of beauty to change. Responding to this call from women an international brand of
soap challenged the traditional sense of beauty and "Real" women were portrayed in the company's ads with grey
hair, wrinkles and flawed skin. 65% of women 35-40 years of age felt good. 50% found ads to be old fashioned.
Segmenting the Women Work Wise
According to the work status, women may be segmented into following categories
 Stay at home housewives
 Plan to work housewives
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Consumer Psychology (PSY - 514)
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Just a job working women
Career oriented working women
Just a job working woman seems to be motivated to work primarily by a sense that family requires the
additional income
Career oriented working women who tend to be in professional or managerial position are driven by the
need to achieve and succeed in their chosen careers
The percentage of career oriented working women is on the rise world wide. A study conducted in USA found
that 25% of all working women bring home paycheck that is larger than their husband's.
Working women spend less time shopping than non-working women. They accomplish this time economy by
shopping less often and by being brand and store loyal. Working women are also likely to shop on early evenings
or on weekends. Magazines are delivering a larger women's audience than Television. Every year more retailers
target women.
Differences in Acquisition and Consumption Behaviors
Women more likely to engage in thorough examination of a message and make extended decisions based on
product attributes. Males are selective information processors. Males are more sensitive to personally relevant
information. Women pay more attention to personally relevant information as well as information relevant to
others. Women are more likely to engage in compensatory eating ­ making up for deficiencies such as lack of
social contact or depression by eating.
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Table of Contents:
  1. INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY:Consumer Behavior
  2. INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY:Consumer research
  3. INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY:Marketing Mix, Product, Price
  4. INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY:Customer Value, Perceived Value
  5. VALUE AND RETENTION FOCUSED MARKETING AND CONSUMER DECISION MAKING PROCESS
  6. CONSUMER RESEARCH:Quantitative Research, Qualitative Research
  7. MAJOR STEPS IN CONSUMER RESEARCH PROCESS:Design of Primary research
  8. QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGNS & DATA COLLECTION METHODS
  9. QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH DATA COLLECTION TECHNIQUES:ATTITUDE SCALES
  10. QUALITATIVE RESEARCH DESIGNS & DATA COLLECTION METHODS
  11. CUSTOMER SATISFACTION MEASUREMENT, SAMPLING, AND DATA ANALYSIS AND REPORTING
  12. MARKET SEGMENTATION AND ITS BASES:Geographical Segmentation
  13. BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: DEMOGRAPHIC SEGMENTATION PSYCHOGRAPHIC SEGMENTATION
  14. BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: SOCIOCULTURAL SEGMENTATION USE RELATED SEGMENTATION USAGE SITUATION SEGMENTATION
  15. BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: BENEFIT SEGMENTATION:Intrinsic Cues
  16. BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: HYBRID SEGMENTATION STRATEGIES
  17. MARKET SEGMENTATION IMPLEMENTING SEGMENTATION STRATEGIES ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES CULTURE
  18. HOW CULTURE IS LEARNT ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Formal Learning
  19. CULTURE AND ITS MEASUREMENT ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES
  20. MEASUREMENT OF CULTURE ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Consumer Fieldwork
  21. SUBCULTURE CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES
  22. AGE AND GENDER SUBCULTURE CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES
  23. BASES FOR SEGMENTATION: BENEFIT SEGMENTATION:Market Segmentation
  24. SOCIAL CLASS CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Occupation
  25. CONSUMER SOCIAL CLASSES CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Affluent Consumer
  26. CONSUMER SOCIAL CLASSES CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Membership Group
  27. CONSUMER SOCIAL CLASSES CHAPTER 4: ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES:Shopping Groups
  28. UNDERSTANDING PERSONALITY CHAPTER 5: INDIVIDUAL DETERMINANTS OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
  29. CONSUMER PERSONALITY, TRAIT THEORY AND SELF IMAGES
  30. CONSUMER MOTIVATION:Needs, Goals, Generic Goals
  31. UNDERSTANDING LEARNING:Intentional and Incidental Learning, Implications for Marketers
  32. INSTRUMENTAL CONDITIONING, INFORMATION PROCESSING AND MEMORY
  33. ATTITUDES:Characteristics of Attitudes, Attitudes have consistency
  34. ATTITUDE FORMATION AND CHANGE:How attitudes are learned?
  35. ATTITUDE CHANGE STRATEGIES:Resolving two conflicting attitudes
  36. INTRODUCTION TO CONSUMER DECISION MAKING:Decision Complexity
  37. Problem Recognition, Search and Evaluation and Decision and Purchase
  38. Decision and Purchase:Consumer Decision Rules, Output, Relationship Marketing
  39. Decisions Related to Post Purchase:Product Set up and Use
  40. Marketing Implications of Decisions Related to Post Purchase:Understanding
  41. Post Purchase Evaluation:Determinants of Satisfaction, Consumer Complaint Behavior
  42. Post Purchase Dissonance:Dissonance Reduction, Marketing Implications
  43. Consumerism:Roots of Consumerism, The Nature of Consumerism
  44. Consumerism Issues and Responses:Environmental Concerns, Consumer Privacy
  45. Review Consumer Psychology Course:Consumer Research, Consumerism