ZeePedia buy college essays online


Operations Research

<<< Previous Transportation Problems:DEGENERACY, Destination Next >>>
 
Operations Research (MTH601)
195
a) Develop an optimum transportation schedule and give the minimum transportation cost.
b)  Is it possible to have more than one optimum schedule? If so, give at least one more optimum
schedule.
13.
Peru enterprise has three factories at location A, B and C, which supplies three warehouses, located at
D, E and F. Monthly factory capacities are 10, 18 and 15 units respectively. Monthly warehouse
requirements are 75, 20 and 50 units respectively.
Warehouse
Factory
D
E
F
A
5
1
7
B
6
4
6
C
3
2
5
The penalty costs for not satisfying demand at the warehouses D, E and F are Rs. 5, Rs. 3, and Rs. 2
per unit respectively. Determine the optimal distribution for Peru using any of the known algorithms.
14.
A fleet operator has in his three depots P, Q and R 1 bus and 8 buses and 7 buses respectively. He has
to allocate them to those bus stands X, Y and Z, which require 2, 5 and 9 buses respectively. The
following table gives the distances in kilometers from each depot to each bus stand. Find the optimum
allocation.
X
Y
Z
P
6
4
12
Q
10
6
5
R
15
16
8
15.
A firm has 4 factories, which produce 8, 7, 9 and 4 units respectively of a product. The firm owns three
stores, which sells 8 units respectively. The unit transportation cost is given below in the table.
Store
Factory
A
B
C
P
10
9
8
Q
10
7
10
R
11
9
7
S
12
14
10
Find the transportation schedule, which minimizes the distribution cost.
DEGENERACY
In the examples discussed so far, the solution procedure yielded exactly (m + n - 1) strictly positive
allocations, in independent positions indicating non-degenerate basic feasible solution. When either of the
conditions for conducting optimality is absent it results in a degenerate solutions. The circumstances in many
cases may not yield result, which satisfy conditions for optimality tests. We may have less number of cells
alloted even in the initial basic feasible solution, found, either by North West Corner rule or other methods
described previously. It may be sometimes non-degenerate in the initial basic feasible solution but at any
intermediate iteration (while we conduct the optimality test) it may lead to a case of a degenerate feasible
solution. This particularly occurs when a row and a column simultaneously vanish, while making allocations
initially by any of the methods. Th situation of degeneracy can be resolved as explained in the next paragraph.
195
img
Operations Research (MTH601)
196
A feasible solution with independence, but with fewer than the required number of individual
allocations is changed to become permissible in the following way. We have to choose the required number of
cells, such that this number plus the existing allocation come to exactly (m + n - 1) cells should be in
independent positions. Then, an infinitesimal but positive allocation, say an amount equal to is allotted to each
of the chosen unoccupied cells. This fictitious allotment does not change the physical nature of the original set
of allocations, but will be helpful to carry out the iterations. This small fictitious quantity plays an auxiliary role
and it is removed when the optimum is reached.
Sometimes a feasible solution may degenerate to m + n - 3 or even fewer independent allocations. In
such cases, if the transportation method is to be adopted in finding a solution to the problem, we will have to
introduce two or more infinitesimal variables (). The 's are also placed in various independent positions and
can be distinguished from each other by subscripts.
Example: Solve the following transportation problem to minimize the total cost of transportation.
Destination
Origin
1
2
3
4
Supply
1
14
56
48
27
70
2
82
35
21
81
47
3
99
31
71
63
93
Demand
70
35
45
60
210
Solution: First obtain an indicial basic feasible solution with Vogel's Approximation Method from the table 62
Table 62
Destination
Origin
1
2
3
4
Supply
Penalty
70
14
1
56
48
27
70
(13)
2
82
35
21
81
47
(14)
3
99
31
71
63
93
(32)
Demand
70
35
45
60
210
Penalty
(68)
(4)
(36)
(36)
Supply 70 to 1 from 1. Hence row 1 and column 1 are both eliminated. The reduced matrix is shown in table 63
Table 63
Destination
Origin
2
3
4
Supply
Penalty
45
21
2
35
81
47
(14)
3
31
71
63
93
(32)
Demand
35
45
60
140
Penalty
(4)
(50)
(18)
Supply 45 to 3 from 2 and hence column 3 is eliminated, resulting in table 64
196
img
Operations Research (MTH601)
197
Table 64
Destination
Origin
2
4
Supply
2
2
35
81
2
(46)
3
63
93
(32)
Demand
35
60
95
Penalty
(4)
(18)
Supply 35 items from origin 2 to destination 2 and row 2 is deleted.
Table 65
Destination
Origin
2
4
Supply
33
60
31
63
3
93
Demand
33
60
93
Summarising the above results we have the initial feasible allocation as exhibited in table 66
Table 66
Destination
Origin
1
2
3
4
Supply
1
70
70
2
2
45
47
3
33
60
93
Demand
Cost: 70 x 14 + 2 x 35 + 45 x 21 + 33 x 31 + 60 x 63 = Rs. 6798/-
Table 67
Destination
Origin
1
2
3
4
1
14
56
48
27
2
82
35
21
81
3
99
31
31
63
Cost matrix
To conduct the optimality test for the above solution there must be 6 ( = 3 + 4 - 1) cells to which
allocation must have been made. But we have made allotment to 5 cells only. Hence this is a degenerate basic
feasible solution.
To resolve the case of degeneracy, we introduce a very small quantity in a vacant and independent
cell. In the above problem we allot to cell (1, 4), which is independent. The optimality test can now be
conducted as shown in the following tables 68 to 72.
197
img
Operations Research (MTH601)
198
Table 68
Destination
Origin
1
2
3
4
1
70
2
2
45
3
33
60
Allotment matrix
Table 69
Destination
Origin
ui
1
2
3
4
1
14
-
-
27
0
u1
2
-
35
21
-
40
u2
3
36
-
31
63
u3
vj
v1
v2
v3
v4
14
-5
-19
27
Cost of alloted cells and (ui + vj)
Table 70
Destination
Origin
1
2
3
4
1
56
48
2
82
81
3
99
71
Cost of unalloted cells
198
Table of Contents:
  1. Introduction:OR APPROACH TO PROBLEM SOLVING, Observation
  2. Introduction:Model Solution, Implementation of Results
  3. Introduction:USES OF OPERATIONS RESEARCH, Marketing, Personnel
  4. PERT / CPM:CONCEPT OF NETWORK, RULES FOR CONSTRUCTION OF NETWORK
  5. PERT / CPM:DUMMY ACTIVITIES, TO FIND THE CRITICAL PATH
  6. PERT / CPM:ALGORITHM FOR CRITICAL PATH, Free Slack
  7. PERT / CPM:Expected length of a critical path, Expected time and Critical path
  8. PERT / CPM:Expected time and Critical path
  9. PERT / CPM:RESOURCE SCHEDULING IN NETWORK
  10. PERT / CPM:Exercises
  11. Inventory Control:INVENTORY COSTS, INVENTORY MODELS (E.O.Q. MODELS)
  12. Inventory Control:Purchasing model with shortages
  13. Inventory Control:Manufacturing model with no shortages
  14. Inventory Control:Manufacturing model with shortages
  15. Inventory Control:ORDER QUANTITY WITH PRICE-BREAK
  16. Inventory Control:SOME DEFINITIONS, Computation of Safety Stock
  17. Linear Programming:Formulation of the Linear Programming Problem
  18. Linear Programming:Formulation of the Linear Programming Problem, Decision Variables
  19. Linear Programming:Model Constraints, Ingredients Mixing
  20. Linear Programming:VITAMIN CONTRIBUTION, Decision Variables
  21. Linear Programming:LINEAR PROGRAMMING PROBLEM
  22. Linear Programming:LIMITATIONS OF LINEAR PROGRAMMING
  23. Linear Programming:SOLUTION TO LINEAR PROGRAMMING PROBLEMS
  24. Linear Programming:SIMPLEX METHOD, Simplex Procedure
  25. Linear Programming:PRESENTATION IN TABULAR FORM - (SIMPLEX TABLE)
  26. Linear Programming:ARTIFICIAL VARIABLE TECHNIQUE
  27. Linear Programming:The Two Phase Method, First Iteration
  28. Linear Programming:VARIANTS OF THE SIMPLEX METHOD
  29. Linear Programming:Tie for the Leaving Basic Variable (Degeneracy)
  30. Linear Programming:Multiple or Alternative optimal Solutions
  31. Transportation Problems:TRANSPORTATION MODEL, Distribution centers
  32. Transportation Problems:FINDING AN INITIAL BASIC FEASIBLE SOLUTION
  33. Transportation Problems:MOVING TOWARDS OPTIMALITY
  34. Transportation Problems:DEGENERACY, Destination
  35. Transportation Problems:REVIEW QUESTIONS
  36. Assignment Problems:MATHEMATICAL FORMULATION OF THE PROBLEM
  37. Assignment Problems:SOLUTION OF AN ASSIGNMENT PROBLEM
  38. Queuing Theory:DEFINITION OF TERMS IN QUEUEING MODEL
  39. Queuing Theory:SINGLE-CHANNEL INFINITE-POPULATION MODEL
  40. Replacement Models:REPLACEMENT OF ITEMS WITH GRADUAL DETERIORATION
  41. Replacement Models:ITEMS DETERIORATING WITH TIME VALUE OF MONEY
  42. Dynamic Programming:FEATURES CHARECTERIZING DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING PROBLEMS
  43. Dynamic Programming:Analysis of the Result, One Stage Problem
  44. Miscellaneous:SEQUENCING, PROCESSING n JOBS THROUGH TWO MACHINES
  45. Miscellaneous:METHODS OF INTEGER PROGRAMMING SOLUTION