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History and Systems of Psychology

JUNG’S ANALYTICAL PSYCHOLOGY:Carl Gustav Jung

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History and Systems of Psychology ­ PSY502
VU
Lesson 32
JUNG'S ANALYTICAL PSYCHOLOGY
Carl Gustav Jung (1870-1961)
Carl Gustav Jung
Carl Gustav Jung developed an elaborate theory of dreams and dream interpretation. Jung proposed that
the average dream is similar in structure to a drama; Jung maintained that however some dreams could be
too short or fragmented to fit into this structure. Unlike Freud, Jung believed that the manifest dream (the
dream as remembered) contains the actual meaning of the dream ­ the dream is therefore not distorted or
disguised in any way. It is a message or natural expression of the unconscious. Therefore, interpretation
should be based upon a series of dreams rather than a single dream. The usual practice was to interpret each
dream separately, irrespective of what was in the following dream. In Jung's view, dreams show wishes,
desires, conflicts and even give warning about future. He said that a dream is difficult to interpret and
understand since it is expressed in its own unique language of symbols. In order to interpret a dream, Jung
used the process of amplification. In essence, amplification involves elaborating a dream image in order to
determine its significance through direct and indirect association. This is achieved by gaining an insight into
the dreamer's personal associations with the image (direct association), in order to discover the feelings
evoked by a particular dream image or symbol. The meaning and significance of a particular word or image
can vary greatly between individuals depending on the effect it has had on his/her life. The cultural
significance of the image, as well as drawing parallels from the symbolism contained in folklore, history,
fairytales, religion, mythology, rituals etc.
As mentioned earlier, Jung believed that a series of dreams is much easier to interpret than a single dream.
This is due to the fact that significant images will be repeated and the basic ideas and themes behind the
dreams can be recognized more easily. A series of dreams usually indicates a complex conflict. Jungian
dream interpretation also places a great deal of importance on the conscious situation of the dreamer. The
dream is not an isolated event and cannot be detached from the dreamer's everyday life.
Jung developed a system of psycho-therapy based upon his theory of analytical psychology. According to
Jung psychotherapy is not healing but helping to develop. He rejected free association and adopted
dialogue, discussion and full confession.
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History and Systems of Psychology ­ PSY502
VU
The steps involved in Jungian therapy are:
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Reading (for some)
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Collaboration with the therapist
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Focusing on the situation at present
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Making any insight concrete and finding a way to put it into practice.
He also used interpretations of dreams in his method. He further took into view the positive side neurosis.
Jung also stressed the importance of religion in life. He stated that to cure is to make a person symptom
free, but the aim of psychotherapy is individuation.
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Table of Contents:
  1. INTRODUCTION:Methodology, Grading, Course Overview up to Midterm
  2. ANCIENT GREEK PHILOSOPHY/PSYCHOLOGY:Socrates, Plato
  3. GREEK THINKERS:Aristotle, Contiguity, Contrast
  4. PSYCHOLOGY IN THE 5TH TO 12TH CENTURY:Saint Augustine, Avicenna
  5. PSYCHOLOGY IN THE 5TH TO 12TH CENTURY:Al-Ghazali, Ibn-Rushd, Averroes
  6. RENAISSANCE:Rene Descartes
  7. ASSOCIATIONISTS:Thomas Hobbes, John Locke
  8. ASSOCIATIONISTS:David Hume, FRENCH REVOLUTION, Denis Diderot
  9. GERMAN CONTRIBUTION:Wilhelm Liebniz, Immanuel Kant, Friedrich Hegel
  10. INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION:RUSSIAN CONTRIBUTIONS
  11. RUSSIAN CONTRIBUTIONS:Ivan Pavlov, Reflex, Acquisition
  12. RUSSIAN CONTRIBUTIONS:Vladimir Bekhterev
  13. IMPACT OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES ON PSYCHOLOGY:Charles Darwin, Gustav Fechner
  14. STRUCTURALIST SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY:Wilhelm Wundt
  15. FUNCTIONALISM:William James, John Dewey
  16. EUROPEAN FUNCTIONALISTS:David Katz, Edgar Rubin, Jean Piaget
  17. BEHAVIORISM:Edward Lee Thorndike, Law of belongingness
  18. BEHAVIORISM:Albert Weiss, Edwin Holt, Learning, Canalization, Walter Hunter
  19. BEHAVIORISM:J.B.Watson
  20. NEO-BEHAVIOURISTS:Clark Hull, Edward Tolman, Edwin Gutherie
  21. NEO-BEHAVIORISTS:B.F. Skinner, Karl Lashley, Donald Hebb, Hobart Mowrer
  22. GESTALT PSYCHOLOGY:Max Wertheimer, Similarity, Proximity, Closure
  23. GESTALT PSYCHOLOGY:Wolfgang Kohler, Kurt Koffka, Edward De Bono
  24. GESTALT SCHOOL AND DYNAMIC PSYCHOLOGY:Kurt Lewin, DYNAMIC PSYCHOLOGY
  25. HISTORICO-EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY:Leon Vygotsky, Sergei Rubenstein
  26. HISTORICO-EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY:Alexei Leontiev, K.M Bykov
  27. SCIENTIFIC LOOK AT MENTAL DISORDERS
  28. SCIENTIFIC LOOK AT MENTAL ILLNESS:Philippe Pinel, Sameul Tuke
  29. SIGMUND FREUD AND THE PSYCHOANALYTIC MOVEMENT:The Superego
  30. SIGMUND FREUD AND PSYCHOANALYTICAL MOVEMENT:Anna Freud
  31. CARL JUNG AND ANALYTICAL PSYCHOLOGY:Carl Gustav Jung
  32. JUNG’S ANALYTICAL PSYCHOLOGY:Carl Gustav Jung
  33. ALFRED ADLER AND INDIVIDUAL PSYCHOLOGY:Alfred Adler
  34. NEO-FREUDIANS:Harry Stack Sullivan, Karen Horney
  35. NEO-FREUDIANS:Karen Horney, Erich Fromm
  36. ERIKSON and MORENO:J.L. Moreno, Protagonist, Audience, Role playing
  37. HUMANISTIC PSYCHOLOGY:Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, Positive Psychology
  38. MODERN TRENDS IN PSYCHOLOGICAL TREATMENT
  39. MODERN TRENDS IN PSYCHOLOGICAL TREATMENT:Biological Approaches
  40. ANTI-PSYCHIATRY MOVEMENT:D.L. Rosenhan, R.D. Laing, Aaron Esterson
  41. PSYCHOLOGY IN THE THIRD WORLD:Frantz Fanon
  42. PSYCHOLOGY IN THE THIRD WORLD CHINA AND PAKISTAN
  43. PSYCHOLOGY IN THE 21st CENTURY
  44. PSYCHOLOGY IN THE 21ST CENTURY:Consumer Psychology
  45. PSYCHOLOGY IN THE 21ST CENTURY:Sports Psychology, Positive Psychology