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Radio News Reporting and Production

INTERPRETATIVE REPORTING II:Factual Background, SPEECH STORY

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Radio News, Reporting and Production ­ MCM515
VU
LESSON 19
INTERPRETATIVE REPORTING II
Essentials of Interpretative Reporting
The following are the essential elements of an interpretative report.
·
Factual background
·
Eyewitness accounts
·
Interviews
Factual Background
Every interpretative report takes a start with the factual background of the event without which the report
will not be called a complete, comprehensive and compact report and will leave a feeling of vagueness. It is,
therefore, becomes necessary to make the factual background a part of interpretative report. The factual
background of an event is the same that has been gone on air in a result of factual reporting.
As it has already been discussed that in factual reporting the answer to four Ws (What--?
When-?
Where---? Who----?  ) is most important.
Why we need interpretative report of the same event of which news has already gone on air?
It is simply because when an important incidence occurs; because of the minute details of the story and lack
of time in the news bulletin the first news goes on air in a short, crisp form highlighting the gist of the story.
The rest of the things which demand interpretation are left for the next bulletin or for a special commentary
covering the other important aspects of the event.
Eyewitness Accounts
The account of eye witnesses is very important to be recorded for an interpretative report. Amongst eye
witnesses are the direct affectees of the incidents like Accidents, Fire Stories, Earthquake, Floods, etc., the
people though were not the affectees but were present at the spot when the incident occurred.
The expressions of eyewitnesses must be recorded with their names and identifications.
Interviews
Interviews of concerned people such as police officials, fire brigade, social workers, etc. are important to be
recorded to win the confidence of the listeners and to add credibility to the report.
Interpretative Reporting Of Different News Stories
The points of interpretation present in different story types are as follows:
SPEECH STORY
Factual reporting
Who---name(s) of the speaker(s)
Where----venue (place where the speech is delivered)
What------ the most significant point in the speech
When-------time of the activity.
Interpretative Reporting
Speaker ­ present position
Background of speaker, or / and the function
Main points of the speech
Background of any point if it relates to something already existing
Purpose of the speech (background)
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Radio News, Reporting and Production ­ MCM515
VU
Number of audience
Reaction of different people and audience to the speech
Important persons present
PUBLICATIONS
Factual background
What?
The name of the book
Genre ­ novel, biography, research
The topic of the book
Who?
Writer's name, the publisher
Interpretative reporting
The author's introduction
Author's previous works
Present book's topic in detail
MEETINGS
Factual reporting
Who---the active participants of the meeting
When-----time and date when the meeting took place or is to be taken place
Where------the venue
What------the topic of the meeting, the result of the meeting
Why------the purpose of the meeting
Interpretative reporting
The background of the issue
Previous meetings in the same context
Previous meetings' results
EVENTS =>FAIRS, EXHIBITIONS, FESTIVALS
Factual Reporting
What---the name of the event, the nature of the event
Where---the venue
When--- date and timing
Interpretative Reporting
The historical background
The details of festival
The details of exhibition
Introduction of exhibitionist
ILLNESS STORIES
Factual Reporting
Who­ the name & identification of person who is ill
What--the nature of the illness
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Radio News, Reporting and Production ­ MCM515
VU
Where--home, hospital
Interpretative Reporting
Cause of illness
Condition--serious or critical
Doctor's comments
Duration of illness
Family members at bed side
Visitors
Effect of illness on person's public position
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Table of Contents:
  1. WHAT RADIO IS:HISTORY OF RADIO, MARCONI –THE INVENTOR
  2. HISTORY OF RADIO:B.B.C. – 1922, Radio in Sub-Continent, PBC SERVICES
  3. OBJECTIVES OF BROADCASTING IN PAKISTAN:Information, Islamic ideology
  4. NEWS VALUES I:CONFLICT, PROGRESS, VICTORY AND DEFEAT
  5. NEWS VALUES II:TIMELINESS, PROXIMITY, NOVELTY, HUMAN INTEREST
  6. NEWS VALUES AND ELEMENTS OF NEWS:MISCELLANEOUS NEWS VALUES
  7. MEASURING THE IMPORTANCE OF NEWS:Intensity of an Event, NEWS STORY TYPES
  8. TYPES OF NEWS STORIES II:SIMPLE TYPES, ILLNESS, DEATH
  9. TYPES OF NEWS STORIES III:Conspiracy, Drug Trafficking, Lunar Months
  10. TYPES OF NEWS STORIES IV:COMPLEX NEWS, Forms of Government, Monarchy
  11. TYPES OF NEWS STORIES V:Education, Research, Religion
  12. TYPES OF NEWS STORIES VI:Lifestyles, Receptions, Entertainment
  13. SOURCES OF NEWS I:Network of Reporters, QUALITIES OF A REPORTER
  14. SOURCES OF NEWS II:MONITORING, NEWS/ PRESS RELEASE
  15. SOURCES OF NEWS III:National News Agencies, HARD NEWS, SOFT NEWS
  16. REPORTING:ORDER OF REPORTING, REPORTER’S QUALITIES, Well informed
  17. A SUCCESSFUL RADIO REPORTER:Briefing, Reporter’s Ammunition, Meeting Deadline
  18. INTERPRETATIVE REPORTING I:Growth of Interpretative Reporting
  19. INTERPRETATIVE REPORTING II:Factual Background, SPEECH STORY
  20. INTERPRETATIVE REPORTING III:FIRES & ACCIDENTS, CRIME STORIES
  21. INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING I:Thalidomide Scandal, Watergate Scandal
  22. INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING II:Identification of the problem, INTERVIEW
  23. TYPES OF INTERVIEW:Hard News Interview, Informational Interview
  24. ESSENTIALS OF A GOOD INTERVIEW I:Comments and Opinion, Topic must be specific
  25. ESSENTIALS OF A GOOD INTERVIEW II:Preparation of the Interview, Language
  26. RADIO NEWS GLOSSARY:Actuality, Cut, Voicer, Wrap, Hourly, Lead
  27. FUNDAMENTALS OF NEWS WRITING:Inverted Pyramided Style, Telling the Story
  28. FUNDAMENTALS OF WRITING NEWS FOR RADIO I:Language
  29. FUNDAMENTALS OF WRITING NEWS FOR RADIO II:Complex numbers
  30. ESSENTIALS OF A NEWSCASTER:Authority, Credibility, Language, Pronunciation
  31. PRODUCTION AND PLANNING:Principals of Planning a Program
  32. PRODUCER & BUDGETING:Strengths of a Radio Program, Budgeting a Program
  33. JARGONS OF PRODUCTION (Continued):Frequency spectrum, Dead studio
  34. TYPES OF TALK:Qualification of a Talker, Essentials of a talk, Vetting a talk
  35. DISCUSSION:Controlled Discussion, Live Discussion, Current affairs
  36. DISCUSSION:Selection of the TopicKnowledge of the Topic, Narrowing down the topic
  37. RADIO FEATURE:Sound Effects, Narration, Dramatic Feature, Religion, Personalities
  38. RADIO DOCUMENTARY:Commentary, History, Persons, Things, Phenomena
  39. DRAMA:Solo plays, Series, Serial, Soap, Components of Drama
  40. SPECIAL AUDIENCE PROGRAM:Children’s Programs, Women’s programs
  41. SPORTS PROGRAM:Live Programs, Recorded Programs, Preparation of OB
  42. THE MUSIC I:Folk Music, Classical Music, Light Music, Pop Music
  43. THE MUSIC II:Classification of Raga In Terms Of Notes, Aado, Khaado
  44. ETHICS & LIMITATIONS OF MEDIA:Domain of Freedom of Media, Defamation
  45. RECAP:What Radio Is, Timeliness, Elements of news, Types of Reporting, Production