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ETHICS IN SPORT PSYCHOLOGY:Competence, Integrity, Social Responsibility

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Sport Psychology(psy407)
VU
Lesson 32
ETHICS IN SPORT PSYCHOLOGY
In 1965 the internal society of sport psychology (ISSP) was formed in Rome, Italy. The Association for the
Advancement of Applied Sport Psychology (AAASP) is the primary organization within the United States
and Canada for professionals interested in applied sport psychology.
All members of these societies are bound by a code of ethics that governs their interactions with the public
and with other professionals. Their Ethics Code is based in large part on the Ethical Principles and is
composed of a preamble and six general principles.
Principle 1: Competence
Members maintain a high standard of competence in their work. In this regard, they recognize the
boundaries and limitations of their competence. For example, a member trained in exercise and sport
science would not attempt to counsel an individual with clinical symptoms of depression. Members are
continually upgrading their knowledge and expertise through workshops and inservice training.
Principle 2: Integrity
Members practice and promote integrity in the teaching, science, and practice of applied sport psychology.
In this regard, they always present themselves and their credentials accurately and forthrightly. They do not
make deceptive or misleading statements about their qualifications, products, fees, research, or service. For
example, a member would not make unsubstantiated claims about a psychological application that she was
using.
Principle 3: Professional and Scientific Responsibility
Members take their professional and scientific responsibilities seriously. It is a member's responsibility to
protect the reputation of the society and the public from members who are deficient in ethical conduct. In
this regard, they are concerned about the ethical conduct of members whose ethical conduct is not of the
highest level. For example, a member would take steps to prevent and/or expose unethical conduct in
another member.
Principle 4: Respect for People's Rights and Dignity
Members respect the fundamental rights, worth, and dignity of all individuals. An individual's right to
confidentiality, privacy, and personal control are respected at all times. In this regard, members are sensitive
to individual differences associated with gender, age, race/ethnicity, national origin, religion, disability,
sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status. For example, a member would not refuse to provide the
highest level of consideration to an individual on the basis of the person's gender or race.
Principle 5: Concern for Other's Welfare
Members are personally concerned with and take steps to ensure the personal welfare of individuals they
interact with. Conflicts between members or between members and clients are resolved in a manner which
minimizes harm and maximizes the concern for the welfare of others. For example, members do not take
advantage of differences in power and influence between themselves and others.
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Sport Psychology(psy407)
VU
Principle 6: Social Responsibility
Members have a responsibility to share their knowledge and research with members of society. In this
regard, their responsibility is to contribute to the common good of society and to protect the rights of
individuals as they do so. For example, members freely agree to provide workshops that will teach others
how to apply principles of human development. They also agree to share their research findings in
appropriate scientific settings.
References
Cox, H. Richard. (2002). Sport Psychology: Concepts and Applications. (Fifth Edition). New York:
McGraw-Hill Companies
Lavallec. D., Kremer, J., Moran, A., & Williams. M. (2004) Sports Psychology: Contemporary Themes. New
York: Palgrave Macmillan Publishers
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Table of Contents:
  1. SPORT PSYCHOLOGY DEFINED:Issue of Certification, The Research Sport Psychologist
  2. SELF-CONFIDENCE AND SPORT PSYCHOLOGY:Successful Performance, Verbal persuasion
  3. SELECTING SELF-TALK STATEMENTS:Skill accusation, Controlling effort
  4. GOAL ORIENTATION:Goal Involvement, Motivational Climate
  5. CAUSAL ATTRIBUTION IN SPORT:Fritz Heiderís Contribution, Other Considerations
  6. CAUSAL ATTRIBUTIONS IN COMPETITIVE SITUATIONS:Locus of Causality
  7. MOTIVATION IN SPORT:Social Factors, Success and Failure, Coachesí Behavior
  8. FLOW: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF OPTIMAL EXPERIENCE, Goal Setting in Sport
  9. PRINCIPLES OF EFFECTIVE GOAL SETTING:Clearly identify time constraints
  10. A TEAM APPROACH TO SETTING GOALS:The Planning Phase, The Meeting Phase
  11. YOUTH SPORT:Distress and anxiety, Coach-Parent Relationships
  12. ATTENTION AND CONCENTRATION IN SPORT:Information Processing, Memory Systems
  13. ATTENTION AND CONCENTRATION IN SPORT:Measuring Attentional Focus
  14. PERSONALITY AND THE ATHLETE:Personality Defined, Psychodynamic Theory
  15. THE MEASUREMENT OF PERSONALITY:Projective Procedures, Structured Questionnaire
  16. PERSONALITY AND THE ATHLETE:Athletic Motivation Inventory, Personality Sport Type
  17. SITUATIONAL FACTORS RELATED TO ANXIETY AND MOOD:Type of Sport
  18. ANXIETY, AROUSAL, AND STRESS RELATIONSHIPS:Emotion and Mood
  19. ANXIETY, AROUSAL, AND STRESS RELATIONSHIPS:The Inverted-U Theory
  20. ALTERNATIVES TO INVERTED-U THEORY:Apterís Reversal Theory
  21. COPING STRATEGIES IN SPORT:Measurement of Coping Skill
  22. RELAXATION STRATEGIES FOR SPORT:Progressive Relaxation, Autogenic Training
  23. AROUSAL ENERGIZING STRATEGIES:Team Energizing Strategies, Fan Support
  24. AROUSAL ENERGIZING STRATEGIES:Precompetition Workout, Individual Goal Setting
  25. IMAGERY:Skill Level of the Athletes, Time Factors and Mental Practice
  26. IMAGERY:Symbolic Learning Theory, Imagery Perspective. Sensory Mode
  27. IMAGERY:Paivioís Two-Dimensional Model, Developing Imagery Skills
  28. THE ROLE OF HYPNOSIS IN SPORT:Defining Hypnosis, Social-Cognitive Theory
  29. THE ROLE OF HYPNOSIS IN SPORT:Achieving the Hypnotic Trance, Hypnotic Phase
  30. PSYCHOLOGICAL SKILLS TRAINING:Psychological Skills Training Program
  31. PSYCHOLOGICAL SKILLS TRAINING:Performance profiling, Performance routines
  32. ETHICS IN SPORT PSYCHOLOGY:Competence, Integrity, Social Responsibility
  33. AGGRESSION AND VIOLENCE IN SPORT:Defining Aggression, Catharsis hypothesis
  34. AGGRESSION AND VIOLENCE IN SPORT:The Catharsis Effect, Fan Violence
  35. AUDIENCE AND CROWD EFFECTS IN SPORTS:Social Facilitation, Crowd Hostility
  36. TEAM COHESION IN SPORT:Measurement of Team Cohesion
  37. TEAM COHESION IN SPORT:Predicting Future Participation, Team Building
  38. LEADERSHIP IN SPORT:Fiedlerís Contingency Theory, Coach-Athlete Compatibility
  39. EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY:Special Populations, Clinical Patients
  40. EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY:Social Interaction Hypothesis, Amine Hypothesis
  41. EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY:The Theory of Planned Behavior, Social Cognitive Theory
  42. EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY:Exercise Addiction, Bulimia Nervosa, Muscle Dysmorphia
  43. BURNOUT IN ATHLETES:Overtraining and Overreaching, Recommended Intervention
  44. THE PSYCHOLOGY OF ATHLETIC INJURIES:Personality Factors, Coping Resources
  45. DRUG ABUSE IN SPORT AND EXERCISE:Stimulants, Depressants