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Theory of Automata

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Theory of Automata
(CS402)
Theory of Automata
Lecture N0. 27
Reading Material
Introduction to Computer Theory
Chapter 10
Summary
Pumping lemma version II, proof, examples, Myhill Nerode theorem, examples
Pumping Lemma version II
Statement
Let L be an infinite language accepted by a finite automaton with N states, then for all words w in L that have
langth more than N, there are strings x,y and z (y being non-null string) and length(x) + length(y) N s.t.
w = xyz and all strings of the form xynz are in L for n = 1,2,3, ...
Proof
The lemma can be proved, considering the following examples
Example
Consider the language PALINDROME which is obviously infinite language. It has already been shown that the
PALINDROME satisfies pumping lemma version I (previous version). To check whether the new version of
pumping lemma still holds in case of the PALINDROME, let the PALINDROME be a regular language and be
accepted by an FA of 78 states. Consider the word w = a85ba85.
Decompose w as xyz, where x,y and z are all strings belonging to ¬* while y is non-null string, s.t.
length(x) + length(y) 78, which shows that the substring xy is consisting of a's and xyyz will become
amore than 85ba85 which is not in PALINDROME. Hence pumping lemma version II is not satisfied for the
language PALINDROME. Thus pumping lemma version II can't be satisfied by any non regular language.
Following is another example in this regard
Example
Consider the language PRIME, of strings defined over Σ = {a}, as {ap : p is prime}, i.e.
PRIME = {aa, aaa, aaaaa, aaaaaaa, ...}
To prove this language to be nonregular, suppose contrary, i.e. PRIME is a regular language, then there exists
an FA accepts the language PRIME. Let the number of states of this machine be 345 and choose a word w from
PRIME with length more than 345, say, 347 i.e. the word w = a347
Since this language is supposed to be regular, therefore according to pumping lemma xynz, for n = 1,2,3,... are
all in PRIME.
Consider n=348, then xynz = xy348z = xy347yz. Since x,y and z consist of a's, so the order of x, y, z does not
matter i.e. xy347yz = xyzy347 = a347 y347, y being non-null string and consisting of a's it can be written y = am,
m=1,2,3,...,345.
Thus xy348z = a347 (am)347 = a347(m+1)
Now the number 347(m+1) will not remain PRIME for m = 1,2,3, ..., 345. Which shows that the string xy348z is
not in PRIME. Hence pumping lemma version II is not satisfied by the language PRIME. Thus PRIME is not
regular.
Strings belonging to same class
Consider a regular language L, defined over an alphabet ¬. If, two strings x and y, defined over ¬, are run over
an FA accepting the language L, then x and y are said to belong to the same class if they end in the same state,
no matter that state is final or not.
Note: It is to be noted that this concept of strings x and y can be compared with indistinguishable strings w.r.t. L
(discussed earlier). Equivalently, the strings x and y are said to belong to same class if for all strings z, either xz
and yz belong to L or xz and yz don't belong to L.
Myhill Nerode theorem
Statement
For a language L, defined over an alphabet¬,
L partitions ¬* into distinct classes.
If L is regular then, L generates finite number of classes.
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Theory of Automata
(CS402)
If L generates finite number of classes then L is regular.
The proof is obvious from the following examples
Example
Consider the language L of strings, defined over ¬ = {a,b}, ending in a.
It can be observed that L partitions ¬* into the following two classes
C1 = set of all strings ending in a.
C2 = set of all strings not ending in a.
Since there are finite many classes generated by L, so L is regular and hence following is an FA, built with the
help of C1 and C2, accepting L.
a
b
a
C1+
C2-
b
Example
Consider the language L of strings, defined over ¬ = {a,b}, containing double a. It can be observed that L
partitions ¬* into the following three classes
C1 = set of all strings without aa but ending in a.
C2 = set of L and all strings without aa but ending in b.
C3 = set of all strings containing aa.
Since there are finite many classes generated by L, so L is regular and hence following is an FA, built with the
help of C1, C2 and C3, accepting L.
a,b
b
a
a
C1
C3+
C2-
b
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